Needed: Projects for 8,000 genocide convicts set for release soon

Tuesday April 16 2019

TIG

Some genocide convicts were sentenced with community service known as TIG instead of jail terms. The government faces the daunting task of integrating them back to society once they are released. PHOTO | CYRIL NDEGEYA  

JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
By JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
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The government faces a tough task of integrating back to society the increasing number of genocide convicts who are set to complete their sentence terms soon.

As the country commemorates 25 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, officials at Ibuka, the umbrella organisation of Genocide survivors said there is a need for programmes to manage the transfer of over 8,000 genocide convicts, alongside hundreds of individuals sentenced for crimes like genocide ideology and divisionism who are set for release in the next four years.

IBUKA cites cases of convicts who either have not reformed nor admitted their crimes or shown remorse to the survivors during several programmes aimed at forgiveness and healing.

This could compromise the reconciliation process. “There is a need for specific programmes to not only prepare those genocide convicts who are getting out of prison, but to also prepare the survivors so they are not caught by surprise by the release of their families’-4383200-92wbn5z/index.html">Lifestyle

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  • Needed: Projects for 8,000 genocide convicts set for release soon

    Tuesday April 16 2019

    TIG

    Some genocide convicts were sentenced with community service known as TIG instead of jail terms. The government faces the daunting task of integrating them back to society once they are released. PHOTO | CYRIL NDEGEYA  

    JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
    By JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
    More by this Author

    The government faces a tough task of integrating back to society the increasing number of genocide convicts who are set to complete their sentence terms soon.

    As the country commemorates 25 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, officials at Ibuka, the umbrella organisation of Genocide survivors said there is a need for programmes to manage the transfer of over 8,000 genocide convicts, alongside hundreds of individuals sentenced for crimes like genocide ideology and divisionism who are set for release in the next four years.

    IBUKA cites cases of convicts who either have not reformed nor admitted their crimes or shown remorse to the survivors during several programmes aimed at forgiveness and healing.

    This could compromise the reconciliation process. “There is a need for specific programmes to not only prepare those genocide convicts who are getting out of prison, but to also prepare the survivors so they are not caught by surprise by the release of their families’-4383200-92wbn5z/index.html">Lifestyle

  • sports
  • Videos
  • photos
  • Needed: Projects for 8,000 genocide convicts set for release soon

    Tuesday April 16 2019

    TIG

    Some genocide convicts were sentenced with community service known as TIG instead of jail terms. The government faces the daunting task of integrating them back to society once they are released. PHOTO | CYRIL NDEGEYA  

    JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
    By JOHNSON KANAMUGIRE
    More by this Author

    The government faces a tough task of integrating back to society the increasing number of genocide convicts who are set to complete their sentence terms soon.

    As the country commemorates 25 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, officials at Ibuka, the umbrella organisation of Genocide survivors said there is a need for programmes to manage the transfer of over 8,000 genocide convicts, alongside hundreds of individuals sentenced for crimes like genocide ideology and divisionism who are set for release in the next four years.

    IBUKA cites cases of convicts who either have not reformed nor admitted their crimes or shown remorse to the survivors during several programmes aimed at forgiveness and healing.

    This could compromise the reconciliation process. “There is a need for specific programmes to not only prepare those genocide convicts who are getting out of prison, but to also prepare the survivors so they are not caught by surprise by the release of their families’